ORA-02002 and ORA-00942 while upgrading OWM to 19c

This is a quick post about a problem that we have had while upgrading a DB to 19c.

At 91% of the upgrade, the OWM (Workspace Manager) upgrade was failing with this error error:

Indeed, executing the statement was leading consistently to this problem:

and we have had this result:

So, resuming the autoupgrade job was not a solution.

The view definition is:

but the package wmsys.ltUtil is wrapped, so no chance to understand what was happening.

As a quick fix, we have recompiled the binaries with mixed auditing:

and put the audit_trail=DB in the upgrade pfile (was NONE in this specific case).

After that, restarted the DB in upgrade mode using the same pfile.

After that, the view was giving no errors anymore and we resumed the autoupgrade job.

This is an old troubleshooting method that I call “Database Administration by guess”: I am not sure about the real cause, but the workaround just worked fine for us.

It would be interesting to know if anyone of you have had the same problem, and what were the auditing parameters in your case…

Ludovico

Duplicating a DB and setting up Data Guard through CMAN and SSH tunnel

I am fascinated about the new Zero Downtime Migration tool that has been available since November 28th. Whilst I am still in the process of testing it, there is one big requirement that might cause some headache to some customers. It is about network connectivity:

Configuring Connectivity Between the Source and Target Database Servers

The source database server […] can connect to target database instance over target SCAN through the respecitve scan port and vice versa.
The SCAN of the target should be resolvable from the source database server, and the SCAN of the source should resolve from the target server.
Having connectivity from both sides, you can synchronize between the source database and target database from either side. […]

If you are taking cloud migrations seriously, you should have either a VPN site-to-site to the cloud, or a Fast Connect link. At CERN we are quite lucky to have a high bandwidth Fast Connect to OCI Frankfurt.

This requirement might be missing for many customers, so what is a possible solution to setup connectivity for database duplicates and Data Guard setups?

In the picture above you can see a classic situation, that usually has two problems that must be solved:

  • the SCAN addresses are private: not accessible from internet
  • there are multiple SCAN addresses, so tunneling through all of them might be complex

Is it possible to configure CMAN in front of the SCAN listener as a single IP entry and tunnel through SSH to this single IP?

I will show now how to achieve this configuration.

For sake of simplicity, I have put two single instances without SCAN and a CMAN installation on the database servers, but it will work with little modification using SCAN and RAC setups as well. Note that in a Cloud Infrastructure setup, this will require a correct setup of the TDE wallet on both the source and the destination.

Because I put everything on s single host, I have to setup CMAN to listen to another port, but having a separate host for CMAN is a better practice when it has to proxy to SCAN listeners.

Installing and configuring CMAN

The most important part of the whole setup is that the CMAN on the standby site must have a public IP address and open SSH port so that we can tunnel through it.

The on-premises CMAN must have open access to the standby CMAN port 22.

For both primary and standby site you can follow the instructions of my blog post: Install and configure CMAN 19c in the Oracle Cloud, step by step.

In my example, because I install CMAN on the same host of the DB, I configure CMAN to run on port 1522.

CMAN primary config:

CMAN standby config:

This configuration is not secure at all, you might want to secure it further in order to allow only the services needed for setting up Data Guard.

The registration of database services to CMAN through the the remote_listener parameter is optional, as I will register the entries statically in the listener and use a routed connection through CMAN.

Listener configuration

The listener must have a static entry for the database, so that duplicate and switchover work properly.

On primary add to listener.ora:

On standby:

In a RAC config, all the local listeners must be configured with the correct SID_NAME running on the host. Make sure to reload the listeners 😉

Creating the SSH tunnels

There must be two tunnels open: one that tunnels from on-premises to the cloud and the other that tunnels from the cloud to on-premises.

However, such tunnels can both be created from the on-premises CMAN host that has access to the cloud CMAN host:

in my case, the hostnames are:

Important: with CMAN on a host other than the DB server, the CMAN sshd must be configured to have GatewayPorts set to yes:

After the tunnels are open, any connections to the local CMAN server port 1523 will be forwarded to the remote CMAN port 1522.

Configuring the TNSNAMES to hop through CMAN and SSH tunnel

Both servers must have now one entry for the local database pointing to the actual SCAN (or listener for single instances) and one entry for the remote database pointing to local port 1523 and routing to the remote scan.

On-premises tnsnames.ora:

Cloud tnsnames.ora:

After copying the passwordfile and starting nomount the cloud database, it should be possible from both sides to connect as SYSDBA to both DB_CLOUD and DB_ONPREM.

This configuration is ready for both duplicate from active database and for Data Guard.
I still have to figure out if it works with ZDM, but I think it is a big step towards establishing connection between on-premises and the Oracle Cloud when no VPN or Fast Connect are available.

Duplicate from active database

If the setup is correct, this should work:

Setting up Data Guard

  • Configure broker config files
  • Add and clear the standby logs
  • Start the broker
  • Create the configuration:

    The static connect identifier here is better if it uses the TNSNAMES resolution because each database sees each other differently.

Checking the DG config

A validate first:

Than a switchover, back and forth:

Conclusion

Yes, it is possible to setup a Data Guard between two sites that have no connections except mono-directional SSH. The SSH tunnels allow SQL*Net communication to a remote endpoint. CMAN allows to proxy through a single endpoint to multiple SCAN addresses.

However, do not forget about the ultimate goal that is to migrate your BUSINESS to the cloud, not just the database. Therefore, having a proper communication to the cloud with proper performance, architecture and security is crucial. Depending on your target Cloud database, Zero Downtime Migration or MV2ADB should be the correct and supported solutions.

Install and configure CMAN 19c in the Oracle Cloud, step by step

Installing and configuring CMAN is a trivial activity, but having the steps in one place is better than reinventing the wheel.

Prepare for the install

Download the Oracle Client 19.3.0.0 in the Oracle Database 19c download page.

Choose this one: LINUX.X64_193000_client.zip (64-bit) (1,134,912,540 bytes) , not the one named “LINUX.X64_193000_client_home.zip” because it is a preinstalled home that does not contain the CMAN tools.

Access the OCI Console and create a new Compute instance. The default  configuration is OK, just make sure that it is Oracle Linux 7 🙂

Do not forget to add your SSH Public Key to access the VM via SSH!

Access the VM using

Copy the Oracle Client zip in /tmp using your favorite scp program.

Install CMAN

Follow these steps to install CMAN:

 

Basic configuration

This will create a CMAN configuration named cman-test. Beware that it is very basic and insecure. Please read the CMAN documentation if you want something more secure or sophisticated.

The advantage of having the TNS_ADMIN outside the Oracle Home is that if you need to patch CMAN, you can do it out-of-place without the need to copy the configuration files somewhere else.

The advantage of using IFILE inside cman.ora, is that you can manage easily different CMAN configurations in the same host without editing directly cman.ora, with the risk of messing it up.

Preparing the start/stop script

Create a file /u01/app/oracle/scripts/cman_service.sh with this content:

This is at the same time ORACLE_HOME agnostic and configuration agnostic.

Make it executable:

and try to start CMAN:

Stop should work as well:

Add the service in systemctl

Open firewall ports

By default, new OL7 images use firewalld. Just open the port 1521 from the public zone:

 

Bonus: have a smart environment!

Ludo

Oracle Grid Infrastructure 19c does not configure the local-mode automaton by default. How to add it?

I have been installing Grid Infrastructure 18c for a while, then switched to 19c when it became GA.

At the beginning I have been overly enthusiast by the shorter installation time:

The GIMR is now optional, that means that deciding to install it is a choice of the customer, and a customer might like to keep it or not, depending on its practices.

Not having the GIMR by default means not having the local-mode automaton. This is also not a problem at all. The default configuration is good for most customers and works really well.

This new simplified configuration reduces some maintenance effort at the beginning, but personally I use a lot the local-mode automaton for out-of-place patching of Grid Infrastructure (read my blog posts to know why I really love the local-mode automaton), so it is something that I definitely need in my clusters.

A choice that makes sense for Oracle and most customers

Oracle vision regarding Grid Infrastructure consists of a central management of clusters, using the Oracle Domain Services Cluster. In this kind of deployment, the Management Repository, TFA, and many other services, are centralized. All the clusters use those services remotely instead of having them configured locally. The local-mode automaton is no exception: the full, enterprise-grade version of Fleet Patching and Provisioning (FPP, formerly Rapid home provisioning or RHP) allows much more than just out-of-place patching of Grid Infrastructure, so it makes perfectly sense to avoid those configurations everywhere, if you use a Domain Cluster architecture. Read more here.

Again, as I said many times in the past, doing out-of-place patching is the best approach in my opinion, but if you keep doing in-place patching, not having the local-mode automaton is not a problem at all and the default behavior in 19c is a good thing for you.

I need local-mode automaton on 19c, what I need to do at install time?

If you have many clusters, you are not installing them by hand with the graphic interface (hopefully!). In the responseFile for 19c Grid Infrastructure installation, this is all you need to change comparing to a 18c:

as you can see, also Flex ASM is not part of the game by default in 19c.

Once you specify in the responseFile that you want GIMR, then the local-mode automaton is installed  as well by default.

I installed GI 19c without GIMR and local-mode automaton. How can I add them to my new cluster?

First, recreate the empty MGMTDB CDB by hand:

Then, configure the PDB for the cluster. Pay attention to the -local switch that is not documented (or at least it does not appear in the inline help):

After that, you might check that you have the PDB for your cluster inside the MGMTDB, I’ll skip this step.

Before creating the rhpserver (local-mode automaton resource), we need the volume and filesystem to make it work (read here for more information).

The volume:

The filesystem:

Finally, create the local-mode automaton resource:

Again, note that there is a -local switch that is not documented. Specifying it will create the resource as a local-mode automaton and not as a full FPP Server (or RHP Server, damn, this change of name gets me mad when I write blog posts about it 🙂 ).

HTH

Ludovico