First draft of a Common Oracle Environment… for the Cloud Database (and not only)

I have just published on GitHub a draft of a common Oracle environment scripts that make the shell environment a little bit smarter than what it is by default. It uses some function and aliases that I have published during the past years.

You can start playing with:

Ideal for the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

If you are new to the Oracle Cloud, probably you do not have environment scripts that makes it easy to interact with the database.

The environment scripts that I have published work out-of the box in the cloud (just make sure that you have rlwrap installed so that you can have a better CLI experience).

Actually, they work great as well on-premises, but I assume that you already have something automatic there.

Some examples

  • My famous Smart Prompt 😉 (including version, edition, exit code, etc)

  • u : gets the status of the databases

  • pmon: just displays the running pmon processes

  • db : sets the environment for a specific DB_NAME, DB_UNIQUE_NAME or SID

  • svcstat : shows the running services (and the corresponding pdb, host, etc) as I described in my previous post

  • s_ : smart alias for sqlplus: connects as sysdba/sysasm by default, or with any arguments that you pass:

  • adr_, dg_ rman_, cm_, lsn_ : aliases for common oracle binaries
  • genpasswd : generates random passwords (default length 30)

  • lsoh: lists the Oracle Homes attached to the inventory

  • setoh: sets the Oracle Home given its name in the inventory

 

You might want to install the same environment for oracle, grid (if you have role separation, it should be the case for Cloud DB Systems) and (eventually) root.

I am curious to know if it works well for your environment.

Cheers

Ludo

Oracle Clusterware Services Status at a glance, fast!

If you use Oracle Clusterware or you deploy your databases to the Oracle Cloud, you probably have some application services defined with srvctl for your database.

If you have many databases, services and nodes, it might be annoying, when doing maintenance or service relocation, to have a quick overview about how services are distributed across the nodes and what’s their status.

With srvctl (the official tool for that), it is a per-database operation:

If you have many databases, you have to run db by db.

It is also slow! For example, this database has 20 services. Getting the status takes 27 seconds:

Instead of operating row-by-row (get the status for each service), why not relying on the cluster resources with crsctl and get the big picture once?

crsctl stat res -f  returns a list of ATTRIBUTE_NAME=value for each service, eventually more than one if the service is not singleton/single instance  but uniform/multi instance.

By parsing them with some awk code can provide nice results!

STATE, INTERNAL_STATE and TARGET are useful in this case and might be used to display colours as well.

  • Green: Status ONLINE, Target ONLINE, STABLE
  • Black: Status OFFLINE, Target OFFLNE, STABLE
  • Red: Status ONLINE, Target OFFLINE, STABLE
  • Yellow: all other cases

Here’s the code:

Here’s what you can expect, for 92 services distributed on 4 nodes and a dozen of databases (the output is snipped and the names are masked):

I’d be curious to know if it works well for your environment, please comment here. 🙂

Thanks

Ludo