Far Sync and Fast-Start Failover Protection modes

Oracle advertises Far Sync as a solution for “Zero Data Loss at any distance”. This is because the primary sends its redo stream synchronously to the Far Sync, which relays it to the remote physical standby.

There are many reasons why Far Sync is an optimal solution for this use case, but that’s not the topic of this post 🙂

Some customers ask: Can I configure Far Sync to receive the redo stream asynchronously?

Although a direct standby receiving asynchronously would be a better idea, Far Sync can receive asynchronously as well.

And one reason might be to send asynchronously to one Far Sync member that redistributes locally to many standbys.

It is very simple to achieve: just changing the RedoRoutes property on the primary.

This will work seamlessly. The v$dataguard_process will show the async transport process:

 

What about Fast-Start Failover?

Up to and including 19c, ASYNC transport to Far Sync will not work with Fast-Start Failover (FSFO).

ASYNC redo transport mandates Maximum Performance protection mode, and FSFO supports that in conjunction with Far Sync only starting with 21c.

Before 21c, trying to enable FSFO with a Far Sync will fail with:

So if you want FSFO with Far Sync in 19c, it has to be MaxAvailability (and SYNC redo transport to the FarSync).


If you don’t need FSFO, as we have seen, there is no problem. The only protection mode that will not work with Far Sync is Maximum Protection:

If FSFO is required, and you want Maximum Performance before 21c, or Maximum Protection, you have to remove Far Sync from the redo route.

Ludovico

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Ludovico

Principal Product Manager at Oracle
Ludovico is a member of the Oracle Database High Availability (HA), Scalability & Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) Product Management team in Oracle. He focuses on Oracle Data Guard, Flashback technologies, and Cloud MAA.

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