Oracle Grid Infrastructure 19c does not configure the local-mode automaton by default. How to add it?

I have been installing Grid Infrastructure 18c for a while, then switched to 19c when it became GA.

At the beginning I have been overly enthusiast by the shorter installation time:

The GIMR is now optional, that means that deciding to install it is a choice of the customer, and a customer might like to keep it or not, depending on its practices.

Not having the GIMR by default means not having the local-mode automaton. This is also not a problem at all. The default configuration is good for most customers and works really well.

This new simplified configuration reduces some maintenance effort at the beginning, but personally I use a lot the local-mode automaton for out-of-place patching of Grid Infrastructure (read my blog posts to know why I really love the local-mode automaton), so it is something that I definitely need in my clusters.

A choice that makes sense for Oracle and most customers

Oracle vision regarding Grid Infrastructure consists of a central management of clusters, using the Oracle Domain Services Cluster. In this kind of deployment, the Management Repository, TFA, and many other services, are centralized. All the clusters use those services remotely instead of having them configured locally. The local-mode automaton is no exception: the full, enterprise-grade version of Fleet Patching and Provisioning (FPP, formerly Rapid home provisioning or RHP) allows much more than just out-of-place patching of Grid Infrastructure, so it makes perfectly sense to avoid those configurations everywhere, if you use a Domain Cluster architecture. Read more here.

Again, as I said many times in the past, doing out-of-place patching is the best approach in my opinion, but if you keep doing in-place patching, not having the local-mode automaton is not a problem at all and the default behavior in 19c is a good thing for you.

I need local-mode automaton on 19c, what I need to do at install time?

If you have many clusters, you are not installing them by hand with the graphic interface (hopefully!). In the responseFile for 19c Grid Infrastructure installation, this is all you need to change comparing to a 18c:

as you can see, also Flex ASM is not part of the game by default in 19c.

Once you specify in the responseFile that you want GIMR, then the local-mode automaton is installed  as well by default.

I installed GI 19c without GIMR and local-mode automaton. How can I add them to my new cluster?

First, recreate the empty MGMTDB CDB by hand:

Then, configure the PDB for the cluster. Pay attention to the -local switch that is not documented (or at least it does not appear in the inline help):

After that, you might check that you have the PDB for your cluster inside the MGMTDB, I’ll skip this step.

Before creating the rhpserver (local-mode automaton resource), we need the volume and filesystem to make it work (read here for more information).

The volume:

The filesystem:

Finally, create the local-mode automaton resource:

Again, note that there is a -local switch that is not documented. Specifying it will create the resource as a local-mode automaton and not as a full FPP Server (or RHP Server, damn, this change of name gets me mad when I write blog posts about it 🙂 ).

HTH

Ludovico

Oracle Database 12c finally out!! First impressions

After a long, long wait, Oracle finally announced the availability of his new generation database. And looking at the new features, I think it will take several months before I’ll learn them all. The impressive number of changes brings me back to the release 10gR1, and I’m not surprised that Oracle has waited so long, I still bet that we’ll find a huge amount of bugs in the first release. We need for sure to wait a first Patchset, as always, before going production.

Does ‘c’ stand for cloud?

While Oracle has developed this release with the cloud  in mind, the first word that comes out of my mind is “consolidation”. The new claimed feature  Pluggable Database (aka Oracle Multitenancy) will be the dream of every datacenter manager along with CloneDB (well, it was somehow already available on 11.2.0.2) and ASM Thin_provisioned diskgroups.

But yes, it’s definitely the best for clouds

Other features like Flex ASM, Flex Cluster, several new security features, crossplatform backups… let imagine how deeply we can work to make private, multi-tenant clouds.

First steps, what changes with a typical installation

splash

The process for a traditional standalone DB+ASM installation is the same as the old 11gR2: You’ll need to install the Grid Infrastructure first (and then take advantage of the Oracle Restart feature) and subsequently the Database installation.

The installation documentation is complete as always and is getting quite huge as the Grid Infrastructure capabilities increment.

To meet most installation prerequisites, Oracle has prepared again an RPM that does the dirty work:

oracle-rdbms-server-12cR1-preinstall-1.0-3.el6.x86_64.rpm

Oracle suggests to use Ksplice and also explicitly recommends to use the deadline I/O scheduler (it has been longtime a best practice but I can’t remember it was documented officially).

The splash screen has become more “red” giving a colorful experience on the installation process. 😉

Once the GI is installed, the Database installation asks for many new OS groups: OSBACKUPDBA, OSDGDBA, OSKMDBA. This give you more possibilities to split administration duties, not specifying them will lead to the “old behavior”.

new_OSGROUPS

You can decide to use an ACFS filesystem for both the installation AND the database files (with some exceptions, e.g. Windows servers). So, you can take advantage of the snapshot features of ACFS for your data, provided that the performance is acceptable (I’ll try to test and blog more about this). You can use the feature Copy-On-Write to provide writable snapshot copies, directly embedding a special syntax inside the “create pluggable database” command. Unfortunately, Oracle has decided to deliver pluggable databases as an extra-cost option. :-/

The database creation with DBCA is even easier, you have an option for a very default installation, you can guess it uses templates with all options installed by default.

But the Hot topic is that you can create it as a “Container Database”. This is done by appending the keywords “enable pluggable database;” at the end of the create database command. The process will then put all the required bricks (creation of the pdb$seed database and so on), I’ll cover the topic in separate posts cause it’s the really biggest new feature.

dbca_create_as_pluggable

You can still use advanced mode to have the “old style” database creation, where you can customize your database.

If you try to create only the scripts and run them manually (that’s my habit), you’ll notice that SQL scripts are not run directly within the opened SQL*Plus session, but they’re run from a perl script that basically suppresses all the output to terminal, giving the impression of a cleaner installation. IMO it could be better only if everything runs fine.

Finally, I’ll get something familiar, but with a brand new release number! 🙂

Stay tuned, I’ll write soon about some really interesting features of the new Oracle Database 12c!

Cheers

Ludo