Generating graphs massively from Windows Performance Counters logs

Windows Performance Monitor is an invaluable tool when you don’t have external enterprise monitoring tools and you need to face performance problems, whether you have a web/application server, a mail server or a database server.

But what I don’t personally like of it is what you get in terms of graphing. If you schedule and collect a big amount of performance metrics you will likely get lost in adding/removing such metrics from the graphical interface.

What I’ve done long time ago (and I’ve done again recently after my old laptop has been stolen ūüôĀ ) is to prepare a PHP script that parse the resulting CSV file and generate automatically one graph for each metric that could be found.

Unfortunately, most of Windows Sysadmin between you will disagree that I’ve done this using a Linux Box. But I guess you can use my script if you install php inside cygwin. The other tool you need, is rrdtool, again I use it massively to resolve my graphing needs.

How to collect your data

Basically you need to create any Data Collector within the Performance Monitor that generates a log file. You can specify directly a CSV file (Log format: Comma separated) or generate a BLG file and convert it later (Log format: Binary). System dumps are not used, so if you use the standard Performace template, you can delete it from your collection.

Remember that the more counters you take, the more the graph generation will take. The script does not run in parallel, so it will use only one core. Generally:

Where (Speed factor) is depending on both the CPU speed and the disk speed because of the huge number of syncs required to update several thousands of files. I’ve tried to reduce the number of rrdupdates by queuing several update values in a single command line and I’ve noticed an important increase of performances, but I know it’s not enough.

Converting a BLG (binary) log into a CSV log

Just use the relog tool:

 Generating the graphs

Transfer the CSV on the box where you have the php and rrdtool configured, then run:

 

generated_graphs

Now it’s done!¬†

The script generate a folder with the name of the server (LUDO in my example) and a subfolder for each class of counters (as you see in Performance Monitor).

Inside each folder you will have a PNG (and an rrd) for each metric.

 

generated_graph_cpu

 

Important:¬†The RRD are generated with a single round-robin archive with a size equal to the number of samples. If you want to have the rrd to store your historical data you’ll need to modify the script. Also, the size of the graph will be the same as the number of samples (for best reading), but limited to 1000 to avoid huge images.

Future Improvements

Would be nice to have a prepared set of graphs for standard graphs with multiple metrics (e.g. CPU user, system and idle together) and additional lines like regressions…

Download the script: process_l_php.txt and rename it with a .php extension.

Hope you’ll find it useful!

Cheers

Ludo

SQLServer 2008R2 unattended installation and configuration via powershell

My first steps on Powershell

Ok, Ok, as an “Oracle on Linux Certified Expert”, I’ve never been a great fan of SQLServer (I shouldn’t say this, I’m working on SQLServer since release 6.5…) and I’ve always hated the DOS command prompt.
However, things are changing fast after Microsoft released the Powershell some years ago. It’s surprising, now Windows powershell support new best of breed features like aliases and pipelines. ūüėÄ

Today Microsoft itself recommends Windows Core installations instead of the full ones, and also SQLServer 2012 comes with a lot of new Commandlets to manage your server.

So I’ve decided to move my first steps in the Powershell world and I’ve created a script for a customer that installs and configure a SQL2008 with a single Powershell script.

It has been quite painful to complete, you can download the complete script HERE.

Taking parameters

The very first line accepts named parameters. I’ve tried to reduce the number but I’ve preferred to take, as an example, different disks for different tasks.

Then I’ve put a little of interaction if some parameters are missing.¬†In facts, I can launch my scripts without inline parameters and specify everything when prompted by the script.

Before I prompt for the drive letters for the installation paths, I display a little table with the available local disks:

 

 Installing prerequisites

The commented command is to get the installed features after the installation. No really need to display it, it works really well.

 Dynamically prepare a configuration file

The unattended installation needs some parameters prepared in a configuration file.
This is likely where you will change most of your stuff depending on your standards:
Components, paths, service accounts, you can change everything or modify the script to accept also this variables as parameters.

The full documentation about filling the configuration file is on the MSDN:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms144259%28v=sql.105%29.aspx

Starting the SQL Server 2008 R2 installation

Off course you’ll need an installation media downloaded from the Microsoft customers site with the correct License Keys and mounted somewhere.¬† (remember the $sourceDir parameter?) I’ve decided to change the path in the directory containing the media and then change it back.

 

Launching the Service Pack installation

The Service Pack installation has been a little more painful, normally would be simple but actually the powershell prompt is returned immediately after firing the command. So, to wait it, I’ve had to figure out the name of the process (is the executable name without the file extension .exe), get its process id and wait for that process:

 Changing the TCP port

By default SQLServer starts listening on a dynamic port. If you have a default and you want to configure it without opening the configuration manager, you can do it with this snipplet that I’ve copied from sirSql (thank you for sharing this).

Adding your stuff at the end

Having the installation completed is in midstream. After the installation you may want to add tempfiles to your installation, modify your model database, add default accounts.

That’s up to you. If your scripts are identical you can execute them with sqlcmd.If you want to take benefit of the variables already set in the script you can execute them directly:

Putting all together…

Well, I’ll never paste again all the content here, you can download the script HERE. Just change the file extension from .txt to .ps1.

I know it’s not a rock-solid procedure but it works well for my purposes, feel free to comment or review my script. Just, if you do some improvement on it, please share it and back-link this post!

Cheers

It’s time to come back…

My recent move to Switzerland has kept me a little busy.I’ve applied last August for a consulting position at Trivadis, in their Lausanne location. I can’t hide I’m quite excited to be part of a great company, but now I need to “ride the wave” and come back with some new posts, especially now that MySQL and Oracle are out with new releases. (Well, Oracle Database 12c will be out SOON, I hope!).

Stay tuned, some interesting content coming soon.

Ludo