In-memory Columnar Store hands-on

As I’ve written in my previous post, the inmemory_size parameter is static, so you need to restart your instance to activate it or change its size. Let’s try to set it at 600M.

 

First interesting thing: it has been rounded to 608M so it works in chunks of 16M. (to be verified)

Which views can you select for further information?

V$IM_SEGMENTS gives a few information about the segments that have a columnar version, including the segment size, the actual memory allocated, the population status and other compression indicators.

The other views help understand the various memory chunks and the status for each column in the segment.

Let’s create a table with a few records:

The table is very simple, it’s a cartesian of two “all_tables” views.

Let’s also create an index on it:

The table uses 621M and the index 192M.

How long does it take to do a full table scan almost from disk?

15 seconds! Ok, I’m this virtual machine is on an external drive 5400  RPM… 🙁

Once the table is fully cached in the buffer cache, the query performance progressively improves to ~1 sec.

There is no inmemory segment yet:

You have to specify it at table level:

The actual creation of the columnar store takes a while, especially if you don’t specify to create it with high priority. You may have to query the table before seeing the columnar store and its population will also take some time and increase the overall load of the database (on my VBox VM, the performance overhead of columnar store population is NOT negligible).

Once the in-memory store created, the optimizer is ready to use it:

The previous query now takes half the time on the first attempt!

The columnar store for the whole table uses 23M out of 621M, so the compression ratio is very good compared to the non-compressed index previously created!

 

This is a very short example. The result here (2x improvement) is influenced by several factors. It is safe to think that with “normal” production conditions the gain will be much higher in almost all the cases.
I just wanted to demonstrate that in-memory columnar store is space efficient and really provides higher speed out of the box.

Now that you know  about it, can you live without? 😛

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Ludovico

Oracle ACE Director and Computing Engineer at CERN
Ludovico is an Oracle ACE Director, frequent speaker and community contributor, working as Computing Engineer at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in Switzerland.

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